SPOTTED ON SHELVES: Lay’s Wavy Greek Tzatziki Potato Chips

Lay's Wavy Greek Tzatziki

Were you like me and jealous about tzatziki being one of the finalists for Canada’s Lay’s Do Us a Flavour contest, but not a U.S. finalist? Well, be jealous no more because tzatziki-flavored Lay’s chips are now in the U.S. Although the Canadian ones were Lay’s Kettle Cooked and these are Lay’s Wavy. (Spotted by Wendy at Costco.)

If you’re out shopping and see an interesting new or limited edition product on the shelf, snap a picture of it, and send us an email (theimpulsivebuy@gmail.com) with where you found it and “Spotted” in the subject line. Or reply to us (@theimpulsivebuy) on Twitter with the photo, where you spotted it, and the hashtag #spotted. If you’ve tried the product, share your thoughts about it in the comments.

Also, if you’re wondering if we’ve already covered something, search our Flickr photos to find out.

FAST FOOD NEWS: Jack in the Box Buttery Jack with Garlic Herb Butter

Jack in the Box Buttery Jack

Jack in the Box’s latest burger is the Buttery Jack, which also sounds like a playground torture technique or a drink that will get you messed up super quick.

It comes in two varieties — Classic and Bacon & Swiss.

Both feature a new signature 1/4 lb beef patty topped with melted garlic herb butter in a new toasted gourmet bun. The Classic is also topped with provolone cheese, a creamy tomato sauce, green leaf lettuce, and tomato slices. The Bacon & Swiss also has strips of hickory-smoked bacon, Swiss cheese, and a creamy bacon mayo.

The Classic Buttery Jack has 816 calories, 52 grams of fat, 23 grams of saturated fat, 2 grams of trans fat, 128 milligrams of cholesterol, 1148 milligrams of sodium, and 37 grams of protein. The Bacon & Swiss has 887 calories, 59 grams of fat, 25 grams of saturated fat, 2 grams of trans fat, 1346 milligrams of sodium, and 42 grams of protein.

We wrote about the burger sometime last year while it was being tested and some folks who tried it back then left their thoughts in the comments.

If you’ve tried either one recently, let us know what you think of it in the comments below.

(Image via Jack in the Box’s website.)

REVIEW: Post Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch Cereal

Post Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch

How many grams of whole grains do nutritionists recommend you eat per day?

Like many of you, I have no idea and would like to use my brain’s capacity for numbers that are more useful in life and trivia games, like the number of U.S. presidencies (44), the late Tony Gwynn’s lifetime batting average (.338), and my debit card’s PIN number (1109).

But it’s not really a number one has to remember since it’s on EVERY product that touts whole grain. One can find it on the Whole Grains Council’s stamp that features what I assume is the image of a 1980s blouse with a belt. According to the stamp on this box of Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch Cereal, it’s 48 grams of whole grains.

That sounds like a lot to eat in one day, but a one cup serving of Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch Cereal provides 2/3 of your day’s whole grain. So what’s 2/3 of 48? That’s math I’m too lazy to break out a calculator for. So I shall refer back to the 1980s blouse, which tells me it’s 33 grams.

To give you an idea of how significant of a number that is in the Honey Bunches of Oats World, a bowl of regular Honey Bunches of Oats Honey Roasted Cereal has just ten grams of whole grains.

While a serving of Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch Cereal has 2/3 of my day’s whole grain, it looks like 5/6 of it is made up of flakes.

Post Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch Closeup

There weren’t a lot of honey bunches of oats in this box and it was noticeable with the cereal’s texture and flavor. Crunching my way through the box I mostly felt the texture of cereal flakes and it tasted like a slightly watered down version regular Honey Bunches of Oats Honey Roasted Cereal. But I’m fine with losing a little flavor so that Post can jam more whole grains into the cereal. Besides, I think if you secretly replaced regular Honey Bunches of Oats with this cereal, most folks wouldn’t notice they’re eating a whole grain-ier version.

Other differences between the two cereals? The whole grain one has nearly double the fiber, potassium, and protein. But at the same time also has nearly double the sugar and calories.

According to the Whole Grains Council, most Americans eat only 16 grams of whole grains per day. My Instagram page, which has a lot of French fry and Hello Kitty snack photos, proves I’m one of those Americans.

A nutritionist would probably tell me I should be eating oatmeal, brown rice, and quinoa to get a day’s worth of whole grains. But I don’t have a nutritionist to tell me that, so if I want lots of whole grains with little effort I’ll probably reach for Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch Cereal.

(Nutrition Facts – 1 cup no milk – 220 calories, 25 calories from fat, 3 grams of fat, 0 grams of saturated fat, 0 grams of trans fat, 1 gram of polyunsaturated fat, 1.5 grams of monounsaturated fat, 0 milligrams of cholesterol, 150 milligrams of sodium, 150 milligrams of potassium, 46 grams of carbohydrates, 4 grams of fiber, 12 grams of carbohydrates, 30 grams of other carbohydrates, 4 grams of protein, and a bunch of vitamins and minerals.)

Item: Post Honey Bunches of Oats Whole Grain Honey Crunch Cereal
Purchased Price: $3.99
Size: 18 oz. box
Purchased at: Safeway
Rating: 7 out of 10
Pros: Tastes like Honey Bunches of Oats Honey Roasted Cereal. A serving has 2/3 of my day’s whole grain. Nearly double the fiber, potassium and protein than regular Honey Bunches of Oats cereal. Remembering numbers that’ll help you in trivia contests that may or may not happen.
Cons: Tastes like a slightly watered down version of Honey Bunches of Oats Honey Roasted Cereal. Lots of flakes and not a lot of honey bunches of oats. The Whole Grains Council’s logo looks like a 1980s blouse. Posting PIN numbers. Not eating enough whole grains.

SPOTTED ON SHELVES: Jif Whips Whipped Peanut Butter & Salty Caramel

Jif Whips Whipped Peanut Butter & Salty Caramel

All the Jif Whips flavors that have followed the original flavors in 2013, have been labeled limited edition flavors. It appears this new flavor is not a limited edition. (Spotted by Amber at Target.)

If you’re out shopping and see an interesting new or limited edition product on the shelf, snap a picture of it, and send us an email (theimpulsivebuy@gmail.com) with where you found it and “Spotted” in the subject line. Or reply to us (@theimpulsivebuy) on Twitter with the photo and the hashtag #spotted. If you’ve tried the product, share your thoughts about it in the comments.

Also, if you’re wondering if we’ve already covered something, search our Flickr photos to find out.

FAST FOOD NEWS: Carl’s Jr. Hardee’s Grilled Cheese Breakfast Sandwich

Carl s Jr Hardee s Grilled Cheese Breakfast Sandwich

Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s has a new breakfast sandwich that doesn’t use their Made from Scratch Biscuits.

The Grilled Cheese Breakfast Sandwich features your choice of sausage, bacon, or sliced ham that’s topped with a folded egg, American cheese, and Swiss cheese all on grilled sourdough bread.

It’s available for $2.99 or in a combo meal for $4.69 at participating locations. For a limited time, you can get a $1 coupon off any Grilled Cheese Breakfast Sandwich combo by visiting www.carlsjr.com/coupons or www.hardees.com/coupons.

The sausage version has 640 calories, 43 grams of fat, 19 grams of saturated fat, 0.5 grams of trans fat, 235 milligrams of cholesterol, 1500 milligrams of sodium, 40 grams of carbohydrates, and 30 grams of protein. The bacon version has 510 calories 30 grams of fat, 15 grams of saturated fat, 0.5 grams of trans fat, 215 milligrams of cholesterol, 1290 milligrams of sodium, 39 grams of carbohydrates, and 26 grams of protein.

If you’ve tried it, let us know what you think of it in the comments.

(Image via Carl’s Jr./Hardee’s.)