REVIEW: Doritos Ketchup and Doritos Spicy Mustard

Doritos Ketchup and Spicy Mustard Bag

Name a more American flavor combination than ketchup and mustard. I’ll wait.

Doritos boldly shares its take on this iconic combo with its new limited edition Classic Ketchup and Spicy Mustard flavored chips.

To clarify, the ketchup flavor is only new to the United States as our upstairs neighbors in Canada have been noshing on this since 2014. The spicy mustard one is completely new, inspired by Chinese hot mustard.

Before we get into each flavor, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that Doritos’ texture is always on point. It’s never soggy or stale – unless it’s user error and I leave the bag open. These baddies followed suit and were crunchy.

Doritos Ketchup Closeup

With that, let’s start with ketchup first: if I could only use one condiment for the rest of my life, it would be Heinz ketchup. This was no 57, but for once, I wasn’t not mad about it. The chips were simultaneously pungent, tangy, sweet but perfectly counterbalanced with the softer corn note of the tortilla chip. It was so flavorful that it almost reminded me of the punch of sea salt and vinegar chips, but with a bit of a sweeter flavor. I was also surprised by the pop of flavor because the seasoning did look a bit sparse.

Doritos Spicy Mustard Closeup

Onto the spicy mustard one – I regularly consume Chinese hot mustard. I make it to eat with dumplings, dim sum, bratwurst, and more! So, I am thrilled to share the fantastic news that we can all consume Doritos Spicy Mustard flavored chips without destroying our nasal passages! The chips were relatively mild compared to the actual condiment but were still distinctly mustard. It was almost Dijon-like but with a bigger kick on the end. Depending on how sensitive you are to heat, this could taste spicy to you.

Eating them together, however, was…underwhelming. Clearly, they weren’t necessarily meant to complement because the ketchup overpowered the mustard. Also, I sure as heck will not be using these to replace the actual condiments on my food any time soon. These are a great side of plate friends though!

Doritos Ketchup and Spicy Mustard Back

Unfortunately, these were available as a limited time on Frito-Lay’s website (Snacks.com) and they’re officially sold out. But, I wouldn’t be surprised to see them in store in the future! When that day comes, make sure to snag a bag (or a couple!)

Purchased Price: $5.59 each
Size:
Purchased at: Snacks.com
Rating: 9 out of 10 (Ketchup), 9 out of 10 (Spicy Mustard)
Nutrition Facts: (28g/about 11 chips) Ketchup – 150 calories, 7 grams of fat, 1 gram of saturated fat, 0 grams of trans fat, 0 milligrams of cholesterol, 190 milligrams of sodium, 18 grams of carbohydrates, 1 gram of fiber, 1 gram of sugar, and 2 grams of protein. Spicy Mustard – 140 calories, 7 grams of fat, 1 gram of saturated fat, 0 grams of trans fat, 0 milligrams of cholesterol, 190 milligrams of sodium, 17 grams of carbohydrates, 1 gram of fiber, less than 1 gram of sugar, and 2 grams of protein.

10 thoughts to “REVIEW: Doritos Ketchup and Doritos Spicy Mustard”

  1. Why does everything in the US have to be “spicy”? Doritos did the same thing when they introduced their pickle variety here, but they weren’t nearly as good as the ones they used to sell in Canada.

      1. That’s seems an oddly political response. Anyway, I don’t think the increase in spicy foods is really about Mexican/Central American immigrants, I think it’s because of the prevalence and popularity of cooking shows, where spice is in practically *everything* they make. Watch any episode of Chopped and they’re talking about how the dishes need heat.

        Perhaps even more so than Mexican food, peppers are a staple of Indian, Thai and other Asian cuisines. Chefs, especially those on TV shows, like to show their knowledge of world cuisines and ingredients, so the popularity of spicy foods on those shows then trickles down to viewers, restaurants and ultimately food/snack manufacturers.

    1. I’m so glad that the younger generation is open to spice ,because the Midwestern taste buds Brands used to cater to made everything bland city. Everything had cheese or sour cream powder in it. Bring on the Chiles.

      1. I like spicy foods, but it (and salted flavors) are invading everything. There are flavors all around the world that would be nice additions to our shelves, but US marketers want to beat this horse to death.

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